The Changing Face of Dance: Televisual Excursions into the World of the Aesthetic

By:
Dr. Colleen Dunagan
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This paper examines some of the trends in televised forms of dance, looking at the ways in which the art of choreographed movement has been incorporated into commercials and music videos. Both music videos and commercials function as forms of advertising and of entertainment. When they incorporate dance, both genres draw on principles of concert dance and musical theater while relying upon social dance forms as their primary movement vocabulary. These television genres create a new model for dance, a new venue for choreographers, and a forum for innovative collaborations between dance, film, and music. At the same time, music videos and commercials are essential to an understanding of dance’s function in popular culture and the construction of both image and brand names for consumer products and pop stars alike. Looking at the work of Paul Hunter, Spike Jonze, and Michel Gondry, I investigate the ways in which advertising captures the cultural currency of art to find new ways of creating mass appeal.


Keywords: Dance, Art and Advertising, Television
Stream: Analysing Artforms
Presentation Type: Virtual Presentation in English
Paper: Changing Face of Dance, The


Dr. Colleen Dunagan

Assistant Professor, Department of Dance, California State University, Long Beach
USA

Currently, Dr. Dunagan is an Assistant Professor of Dance at the California State University, Long Beach. She holds a Ph.D. in Dance History and Theory from the University of California, Riverside. Her main research interests are dance philosophy/aesthetics and dance in film and television. Dunagan's dissertation examined the tradition of 20th Century Western dance aesthetics from the perspective of post-structuralist critical theories in order to reveal how dance challenges Romantic and Enlightenment notions of art and author. In a recent publication, “Dance, Knowledge, and Power”, she recuperates Susanne Langer’s philosophy of dance through a merging of Langer's ideas with elements of phenomenology and pragmatism. Currently, Dr. Dunagan's research looks at the proliferation of dance in commercial formats, specifically the presence of dance in commercials. Investigating links between Western theatrical dance practices and dance-based commercials, she examines how dance contributes to popular culture and serves the advertising format as a meaning-maker. Her research has been presented at SDHS, CORD, and the Popular Culture Association.

Ref: A06P0212